SR71 Blackbird Titanium
SR71 Blackbird Titanium
SR71 Blackbird Titanium
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, SR71 Blackbird Titanium
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, SR71 Blackbird Titanium
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, SR71 Blackbird Titanium

SR71 Blackbird Titanium

Regular price
$39.95
Sale price
$39.95
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

        The SR71 is officially still the fastest jet propelled aircraft on record.  This display contains a small sample of titanium from one of these aircraft that crashed. Most of the titanium from these crashes has been recycled and it is becoming harder and harder to find.  This display truly is a piece of American history. 

 

Specs

  • Dimensions  of acrylic are 4x3x1 inches  
  • Sizes of the titanium sample will vary 

 

History of this crash

On the night of 25 October 1967, pilot Maj. Roy L. St. Martin and RSO Capt. John F. Carnochan took off from Beale AFB for what should have been a routine training flight. Several hours into the flight air traffic control informed the crew that they were turning and rapidly loosing altitude.  The inertial navigation system onboard the aircraft had failed. All the instruments indicated that the aircraft was still flying straight.  The pilot ordered the Reconnaissance officer to eject while he would attempt to recover the aircraft. With no references in the black night sky he was unable to do so and also ejected. Both men survived the crash and were picked up by recovery crews shortly after. 

 

The aircraft impacted the ground in almost the vertical position with the engines running at full throttle. The Astro- Inertial Navigation System on board the aircraft used the radioactive isotope carbon 14. The reason this isotope was used is still classified. Due to the radioactive nature of the crash the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to help scrub the site. 

 

Our hunt for the crash site

There was almost no information on the internet about the crash site. The individuals that had been to the crash site were unwilling to give any clue as to where it was located. When we started the search the only information we knew for sure was that the pane had crashed north of Lovelock Nevada.

After 14 hours of pouring over maps, we were able to triangulate the location of the crash based on photos and videos of those that had been to the crash site. Early in the spring of 2021 we set out on an expedition to the Nevada desert to see if we could actually find the crash site.  

When we got out of the truck we were standing on titanium.  Below is a picture of the expedition. 

 

Cory (left) Tim (right)